The 40-minute city


Australians prepared to tolerate at least a 30 minute commute, latest transport study finds

The 40-minute city
University of Sydney Business School Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies (ITLS) director professor David Hensher says its latest transport survey suggests having every suburb within a 40 minute commute of everyday services and jobs may be a more realistic aspiration for transport planners

Australians are willing to accept a half-hour commute or more, suggesting a 40-minute city is a more realistic goal for the largest Australian cities, a study released this week revealed.

The University of Sydney Business School Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies (ITLS) Transport Opinion Survey (TOPS) found about 37 minutes each way is the upper limit for most people.

ITLS The University of Sydney Business School Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies (ITLS) director professor David Hensher says the findings could have an impact on the way that liveable cities are planned.

"There has been a great deal of talk about the 20-minute city with every suburb within a short commute to everyday services and jobs," he says.

"However, this survey offers up the idea of the 40 minute commute city at least as a starting aspiration."

Western Australians are the most intolerant, as they’re only prepared to travel an average of 34 minutes and New South Wales commuters are the most tolerant, with anything under 40 minutes deemed acceptable.

Those surveyed also claimed that one in four of their daily trips suffered from traffic congestion caused by accidents or breakdowns.

It seems Australians are becoming less confident about the efficiency of transport in their local area, as the TOPS confidence index has fallen from 100 points in March 2010 to 47 in March this year and the decline has accelerated since late 2013.

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