Bus patronage stagnant: state-by-state breakdown


Bus travel is still one of the least used modes of transport for working Australians, according to new ABS data

Bus patronage stagnant: state-by-state breakdown
Australian bus patronage stagnant

By Sean Muir |
November 1, 2012



Bus travel is one of the least popular modes of transport for working Australians, with new data showing three out of five commuters prefer to use cars to get to work.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), only 3 percent of Australia’s 10 million workers travel by bus to work,
while almost two thirds, or 65.5 percent,
of Australians
travel by car to work.

Results
from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing, released by the ABS on Tuesday, show 60.2 percent of Australians drive to work, up from 59.4 percent in 2006, while 5.3 percent of the population are driven to work, up from 5.9 percent in 2006.

The results also show 3.9 percent of Australian’s travel by train to work
and 3.7 percent of the population walks to work.

Bus travel was the least used mode of transport, with only 301,187 Australians,
3 percent of the working population, travelling by bus, up slightly from 2.8 percent in 2006.

Census Executive Director Andrew Henderson says the results show a shift in the preferred methods of travel to work for some Australians.

"While the household car is still the preferred method of travel to work for most Australians, the train has overtaken walking as one of the most preferred modes of transport," Henderson says.

"The proportion of people opting to take the train has increased from 3.4 percent in 2006 to 3.9 percent in 2011, putting the train in the top three methods of travel to work."

Henderson
says
the latest release of Census data will inform future planning for public transport and other vital services in communities across Australia.

"Census data is used to allocate government funding for all areas of Australia, and to plan vital services and infrastructure that we all use in our communities every day," Henderson says.

Commuter transport modes by state:


New South Wales

  • 62.6 travelled by car (either as driver or a passenger)
  • 6.2 percent travelled by train
  • 4.1 percent walked
  • 3.7 percent travelled by bus (up from 3.4 percent in 2006

Victoria

  • 66 percent travelled by car (either as driver or a passenger)
  • 4.8 percent travelled by train
  • 3.3 percent walked
  • 1.7 percent travelled by train
  • (bus travel not listed)

Queensland

  • 67.3 percent travelled by car (either as driver or a passenger)
  • 3.7 percent walked
  • 3.3 percent travelled by bus (up from 2.9 percent in 2006)
  • 2.1 percent travelled by train

Western Australia

  • 66.2 percent travelled by car (either as driver or a passenger)
  • 3.7 percent travelled by bus (up from 3.5 percent in 2006)
  • 3.3 percent walked
  • 2.2 percent travelled by train

South Australia

  • 69.1 percent travelled by car (either as driver or a passenger)
  • 4.1 percent travelled by bus (up from 4.1 percent in 2006)
  • 3.2 percent walked
  • 1 percent travelled by bicycle

Northern Territory

  • 64.2 percent travelled by car (either as driver or a passenger)
  • 11 percent walked
  • 3.3 percent travelled by bus (up from 3.4 percent)
  • 2.8 percent travelled by bicycle

Tasmania

  • 69.9 percent travelled by car (either as driver or a passenger)
  • 5 percent walked
  • 2.5 percent travelled by bus (up from 2.5 percent in 2006)
  • 0.9 percent travelled by truck

ACT

  • 69.3 percent travelled by car (either as driver or a passenger)
  • 5.6 percent travelled by bus (down from 5.8 percent in 2006)
  • 4.2 percent walked
  • 2.4 percent travelled by bicycle



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