Paper tickets to stay in 2011


The Queensland Government has given over to public pressure, opting to keep a paper ticket system on its TransLink network, but the price of travel in Brisbane and surrounds will go up in January

Paper tickets to stay in 2011
Paper tickets to stay in 2011

October 29, 2010

TransLink’s paper ticketing option for bus and rail users in southern Queensland will stay in 2011, but the price will rise by 15 percent from mid-January.

Transport Minister Rachel Nolan says the single trip paper ticket will be retained for infrequent users and tourists to easily access public transport.

"We've listened to the Community Reference Group, tourists and infrequent users who have told us they would prefer to be able to purchase a single trip ticket at a station or on-board a bus or ferry, rather than an alternative Go Card," Nolan says.

"It's a model that is working successfully on other public transport networks, including in London and Perth."

Nolan says the Queensland Government will provide incentives for senior and pensioner groups who prefer to use public transport several times on one or two days a week rather than travelling every day.

"Many seniors and pensioners rely on public transport as a convenient way to travel," she says.

"Those using a maroon seniors or green pension Go Card will pay for the first two journeys they take in a day and then Go Card will allow them to travel for free for the remainder of the day."

For every dollar a commuter pays in fares, the Queensland Government currently pays $3 to keep public transport affordable, says Nolan.

"Public transport in south-east Queensland has changed significantly in recent years," she says.

"We have grown patronage by more than 50 per cent, and we have integrated ticketing, more buses, more trains, more busways, new railway lines, new and upgraded stations."

Nolan says the changes will enable the Queensland Government to continue its rollout of services to meet growing demand and the challenges of population growth.

"The government will continue to provide additional funding for public transport with a record budget of $1.4 billion committed in the current year."

This funding, combined with keeping the paper ticket, will add another 305,000 seats to the network over the next year, Nolan claims.

"This is all about getting more people to make the switch from private vehicles as part of our push to double public transport use over the next 20 years."

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