In-vehicle management the key to reducing carbon costs

By: Chris Smith


Minorplanet is capitalising on climate change by championing its vehicle monitoring system as the key for trucking operators to survive

Minorplanet is capitalising on climate change by championing its vehicle monitoring system as the key for trucking operators to survive under emissions trading.

The company’s new engine management system measures individual vehicle emissions while mapping out the best routes to reduce operators’ greenhouse output.

The executive chairman of Minorplanet Asia Pacific, Philip Bennett, says the technology also develops solutions to minimise fuel burn, in turn limiting the impact of the Federal Government’s Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme, which is expected to be introduced in 2010.

While saying the full impact of emissions trading is still unknown, Bennett says operators need to start addressing their emission levels now to reduce the impact the scheme will have once it begins.

"Minorplanet’s engine management technology is not just a breakthrough for improving road management and driver safety but also for helping operators and companies navigate through the maze of the impending emissions trading scheme," Bennett says.

"By industry acting ahead of the curve by implementing eco-efficient technologies to cut emissions now will reduce the impact on their bottom line when the emissions trading scheme comes into full effect in two years’ time."

Certain operators are already being forced to report their emission and consumption levels under the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Scheme, which extends to single operators if they use more than 2.5 million litres of diesel.

The company is also working towards becoming accredited in the Intelligence Access Program, which monitors heavy vehicles in return for allowing them to travel on certain routes.

If it becomes accredited, Minorplanet will be the third IAP provider. Transport Certification Australia (TCA) has passed two IAP providers, Sigtec and Transtech Driven Partnership.

The program has been beset by delays, with the first IAP provider only named in April of this year, four months after one was to be announced.

TCA Chief Executive Chris Konisditsiotis says certification has taken longer than expected because potential providers must meet a number of stringent requirements before being accredited.

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